Google officially ends all public PageRank

In 2014 I wrote about the end of Page Rank … well, make that public page rank. It was the final time Google would update Page Rank in a way that would allow us, the public to know what a site, any site’s page rank was.

That of course didn’t mean Page Rank was dead. In fact it’s the most important part of search engine rankings with Google. The only thing that was going away at that time, was the public’s knowledge of the updates.

Fast forward two years and they’ve finally put the final nail in the coffin. Now not only do they no longer update page rank publicly, they are now resetting all public page ranks from their past records to zero.

For the last two years I could look up the page rank of a site and it would return the page rank as of the last 2014 update. But as of now, that’s no longer the case as every site was set at zero.

If you aren’t familiar with what page rank is, you need to be. Because if you want to improve your SEO you need to understand how important it is to your website.

PageRank is an algorithm used by Google Search to rank websites in their search engine results. PageRank was named after Larry Page, one of the founders of Google.

PageRank is a way of measuring the importance of website pages. PageRank works by counting the number and quality of links to a page to determine a rough estimate of how important the website is. The underlying assumption is that more important websites are likely to receive more links from other websites.

The idea is that information on the web could be ordered in a hierarchy by “link popularity”: a page is ranked higher as there are more links to it.

This removal of public PageRank scores isn’t a surprise. Google told us they would be removing PageRank scores from the Google Toolbars last month … and now my friends, it seems to be gone forever.

The problem with this is, Google PageRank is a tool that someone could use to measure the success of their SEO efforts. It was also something you could use to set your advertising rates as well as your resale value of your website. In the past, a PR9 website would be worth WAYYYYYYYYYYYYY more than a PR2 website. Now though, people can’t use that metric to value their website and this makes things a little more complicated when trying to buy and sell websites.

Sure people call still look at things like their MOZ or Alexa rankings but those can be manipulated and aren’t always all that accurate.

It’s for this reason that people are sad to see the end of public PageRank.

 

 

Affiliate Marketing in the new age!

Most people say that affiliate marketing is dead. I couldn’t disagree more. I just think it’s changed. The days of 70%+ commissions are long gone and as I’ve always said, anyone who offers you those kind of numbers should scare the living hell out of you.

Because no program can be profitable by paying out so much and if they aren’t profitable then they won’t be in business for long.

So I decided to look into mainstream because website owners are reporting massive profits in promoting mainstream programs. So why is that? What does mainstream pay? I decided to find out.

Amazon’s affiliate programs payout varies from 4% to 6%. No that is not a typo. They actually pay less than 10% and have an INSANE number of affiliates promoting their shit all day long. Top Amazon affiliates report earning $10,000+ per month. Last December one Amazon affiliate boasted earning $30,000. Not a bad Christmas, ey?

But that’s not the only thing that surprised me about Amazon’s affiliate program. Their cookie length is 1 day. 1 freaking day?!!!!!!!!!!! In porn affiliates bitch if it’s under 6 months. LOL

Walmart also has an affiliate program. They pay typically 1-4% and their cookie length is 3 whole days.

How about Target? They pay about 2%-5% and have a cookie length of 7 days.

Surely Best Buy pays more, right? Nope. They pay between 1.7% to 6% depending on the item purchased. Their cookie length is 3 days.

Home Depot – 3% to 5% with a 1 day cookie length.

Plenty of Fish – a popular mainstream dating site pays only 20% but that’s much higher than any other of the mainstream programs and they even offer a 60 day cookie length.

So with so many big time mainstream affiliate companies paying so low, could that be the reason why porn affiliate programs struggled?

As someone who has been an porn affiliate for almost 20 years, I can tell you the biggest problem I have is getting paid.

I typically only get paid on about 25% of what I actually earn in any given month.

I probably spend more time chasing my money in a month than I do actually earning it. How sad it that?

So what are the options?

  • #1 I now only do business with companies that have a solid reputation.
  • #2 I have a two strikes and you are out policy. If you are late or bounce a check more than once, I will put you on my fuck you list.
  • #3 I no longer expect any affiliate program to help me with the promotional material I need to well … promote their website. I get it on my own.
  • #4 I don’t do business with affiliate programs that have large payouts. As I said before I know that no business can maintain profitability under those conditions so I know eventually they won’t be able to pay me what I earned so I do myself a favor and avoid doing business with them in the first place.
  • #5 I’m not afraid to do business with a program who is only paying 25%-35%. Why? Because I would rather do business with a guy only willing to pay me 25% and actually pay me what I earned ON TIME EVERY TIME than to do business with a guy offering me 70% and pays me late or his check bounces. I don’t have time for that shit. I want to get paid. I’m tired of the bullshit that comes with the big payout guys. As long as I know up front what I’m going to get, then I’m good with that. I actually do business with a program that pays me 30% but they convert well and pay on time so I’m more than happy with my 30%. I make more with that 30% program than I do with any other programs I work with and some of those pay me up to 60% revshare.

 

Domain Names … Don’t Lose Yours

It seems like everyone has a domain name these days. They’ve become so common we don’t even think about them anymore.

There are almost 300 million registered domains. Think about that … an apartment building with 300 million apartments in it!

You know what’s even crazier? There are not more than 1,000 possibilities for domain name extensions. 248 of those 1000 are country codes are things like .love, .guru, .online, .info, .porn, or even .xyz.

The first domain name ever registered was on March 15, 1985 and it was Symbolics.com. It belonged to a now defunct computer manufacturer – MIT AI Lab. They later sold the domain name, (some 25 years later in 2009) to XF.com Investments out of Dallas for an undisclosed amount.

But what most people don’t know is that it wasn’t actually the first ever domain name. That honor goes to nordu.net. It was created in January of 1985 and was used to serve as the first root server (nic.nordu.net).

Symbolics.com was the first domain name to actually be registered through the appropriate DNS process a few months later.

The most expensive domain name ever sold was LasVegas.com. They paid $12 million in cash but also have a built in payment plan scheduled to be completed over 35 years (2005 to 2040) and the total cost works out to be $90 million!

Other hot domain name sales include …

  • CarInsurance.com – $49.7 million (2005)
  • Insurance.com – $35.6 million (2010)
  • VacationRentals.com $35 million (2007)
  • PrivateJet.com $30.180 million (2012)
  • Internet.com – $18 million (2009)
  • 360.com – $17 million (2015)
  • Insure.com – $16 million (2009)
  • Bankaholic.com – $15 million (2008)
  • Sex.com – $13 million (2010)

But that’s not what this story is about. This story is about protecting what you own.

We sometimes forget how important our domain names are.

But password hacking are more and more common. If someone can steal your credit card, social security number or password to your favorite porn site, what makes you think they can’t get into your domain name account?

The most obvious protection would be to use a strong password. This is something that is at least ten characters in length and includes both letters and numbers and the letters you use are both upper and lower case. Also throw in an odd character like a # sign too. Also don’t use words or names in your password.

Another way to protect your precious domain name account is to use the two step authentication. Simply put you are associating your domain name account with your cell phone number so to log in you not only need your password but a special code that they text you.

Your domain names are valuable and if they are stolen there is no guarantee that you can get them back. In fact there are more than a few stories (sex.com included) where a domain name was stolen and they victim didn’t get it back.

PROTECT WHAT IS YOURS! Lock down your domain name account because if you don’t, it’s not a matter if IF some jack ass will try and break in, it’s just a matter of when.

 

Domain Sellers Beware

It’s a new year and that means it’s time for a world of new scams to pop up. Today’s scam isn’t exactly new but it seems to be more prevalent. Like most scams, it plays off of people’s greed.

How it works is like this … you have a domain name that you want to sale. You list it on one of the various domain listing sites or post about it on one of the Facebook domain sales groups.

Next think you know you are contacted by someone who claims to represent a buyer and they want to buy your domain for some insanely highly value – way way more than your domain is worth.

Hello!

I represent an investor from Canada who needs your domain (———-.com) for his project.

The investor would be prepared to pay a sum in $15,000 – $20,000 range.

If you expect another figure, please specify it in the subject of your reply.

If you have more names I can help you to sell them.

Best Regards,
Eric Danielsen
Vice President
123 REG

The domain I was selling I knew wasn’t worth more than $500. So that they offered me $15k to $20k immediately put up a red flag for me.

It turns out the only way this buyer will pay you the money is if you can provide him with a domain name appraisal certificate.

But here is the catch …. this buyer will only accept one from agencies he knows and trusts.

As I’m sure you’ve guessed by now, this is a scam to get you to pay $59 to $129 for a domain name valuation service.

Simply put, they are trying to scam you into buying their domain name appraisal certificate for your domain name. There was never a buyer interested in paying way more than your domain is worth.

So don’t fall for this scam.

 

 

What is content marketing and how can it make you lots and lots of money?

What is content marketing and what exactly does it have to do with you? Well content marketing is a buzz word we seem to be hearing a lot about lately. But it’s not a new concept at all. Content marketing was around a hundred years ago and it’s just as important today. Only today with the advent of the internet, it’s become a more prevalent part of our lives.

Let’s look at our friends over at Porn Doe. Their Alexa rating is something around 7,301 at the time of this posting. That means out of the millions of websites out there (according to Alexa.com), Porn Doe is the 7,301 most popular website.

As I’m sure you can imagine, their website gets thousands and thousands and thousands of visitors a day. According to one source, they get more than 130,000 unique visitors per day. That means that more than 130,000 actual unique people visit their website each and every single day.

But you know what I’m sure they would like? Even more visitors per day.  I mean, who wouldn’t, right?

Content marketing is a strategy they can use to draw in even more traffic. But what does that mean?

Content marketing is a marketing technique of creating and distributing valuable, relevant and consistent content to attract and acquire a clearly defined audience – with the objective of driving profitable customer action.

For example …. infographics.  You see them all the time now on sites like Facebook and Twitter and they are in fact a perfect example of content marketing. Some company took valuable information they have from their own website, and put it out there in a way that not only informs and educates you about (whatever subject) but in doing so, promotes their own brand at the same time.

Case in point:  When people visit the Porn Doe website they often times will use the search feature to try and find a specific type of video. Porn Doe can then release that information to the public letting us know the most popular type of videos right now.

(I’m making these number numbers up for example purposes)

51% of all visitors from the United States  prefer “teen” videos while 64% of all visitors from India prefer “lesbian” videos.

One company posted an infographic that said “Leading bloggers outsource 25% of their blog posts to external staff.”  It’s one simple fact that some people will find interesting and pass it around and every time someone does, that promotes their business.

Let’s look at a sample infographic from The Wall Street Journal. Now every time someone shares this picture of internet social media facts, it promotes The Wall Street Journal.

social-engagement-infographic-498x554

Think it’s not a big deal? Think again.

78% percent of chief marketing officers think content marketing is the future of marketing.

It’s better than your typical advertising methods like banner or text links for a variety reasons but I think the most important is that if it’s helpful, it’s usually more memorable than normal advertising.

Content marketing builds trust and grabs people attention.

Infographics aren’t the only form of content marketing but they are probably the most popular.

You can also do it in the form of eBooks. Create an small eBook about a specific subject that is relevant to what your website is about. Save that bad boy as a PDF and then give that eBook away for free. Now every time someone shares that eBook with someone else, it will promote your website.

Just remember, the rule of thumb here is to educate and inform, NOT SALE! Sure you can put your website name on the footer of every page of that eBook but don’t do anything else to push your website. Instead make an actual eBook that is informative and helpful. Create something that people will want to share with others.

You can also create helpful and informative YouTube videos (as long as they are G or PG rated. Remember YouTube hates porn!)

Look what this guy did.

 

Creating videos like this inform and educate and at the same time promote the guys website. That video is a perfect example of content marketing.

So if you aren’t content marketing, get on it! You have no excuse now that you know exactly what it is!

 

The Rules of Social Networking Do Matter

The article will help you understand the very few but important rules of Twitter and Facebook so you don’t get your accounts banned.

When it comes to marketing your brand and yes porn stars that means yourself, you need social networking sites like twitter and Facebook.

The problem is, far to many porn stars (or others in the industry) don’t seem to get the rules and find themselves working hard to build up their accounts, getting tons of followers and fans only to lose their account.

So here are a few simple but very important rules to follow —

First let’s start with Facebook. Facebook doesn’t like porn or anything directly associated with it — so if you are going to use Facebook to promote yourself or your brand then you need to be extra careful about the rules.

Rule #1: Facebook requires that you use your real name if you want a standard Facebook account. If you want to use your porn star name you’ll need to create a “page”. Here is the Facebook page for porn star Audrey Hollander.

If you want a normal account (here is a link to my Facebook account), use your real name, not something like YourfirstName YourCompany name. ie: Kelli PornCompanyName. If you want a traditional Facebook account you can’t use your company name, or some made up name – you have to use your real name. There are no exceptions to this rule. If you want your Facebook page to be called your company name, create a PAGE.

Rule #2: Don’t ever post pictures of yourself naked. Sex is a big no no on Facebook and it can get you banned. If you want to post sexy pictures that’s fine but do make sure you aren’t exposing your breasts or private parts.

Now let’s look at Twitter.

Twitter doesn’t really care what you call yourself. But what they do care about is your avatar, header image and background.

You may not have nudity in your header image, your avatar or your background. You can have sexy pictures but no nudity.

Can you tweet pictures of yourself naked? So far Twitter has allowed us to post all the naughty pictures we want BUT there is a catch … you need to adjust your twitter settings (under settings) and mark your photos as potentially sensitive.

twitter settings

If you do not do this and you tweet out naughty pictures of yourself, your twitter account couple potentially be banned.

Know the worth of your traffic

We all know that no matter what kind of site you have, in the end it’s about traffic. Without it, your site is worthless. We all need those all mighty visitors and the more the merrier.

The question is, how much is your traffic worth?

Well it obviously depends on the type of site you have, but in my case, I have a free site, that generates traffic to sale. So knowing the value of my traffic is really important, so that I know how much to sell it for.

Not too long ago I was in need of so I offered up one of my ad spots for $50 a month ($600 for the year). It was really stupid of me to do that because the value of that traffic is much more, but like I said, that particular day I wanted to make a quick $600 for something I needed right away.

I setup the deal with a new website owner but when it came time to pay me, he flaked. That’s not uncommon in our business. I found over the years there are a lot of people who are all talk and this dumb ass was just like the rest of them.

Annoyed and no longer in “need” of the quick cash, I put up an affiliate banner for one of Vivid’s new porno parody movies. In 3 days that ad spot made me $56.40.

Simple fact is, my traffic on that site was high quality, search engine traffic about porn stars – so I sent it to an affiliate program that I knew converted and was about porn stars. In the end I’ll make far more than $50 a month for that traffic than I would have, if I would have taken the other guys money. So that obviously worked out well for me that the other guy flaked.

But how can others know how much their traffic is worth?

That is what this article is really about. I’ll get more into that later though so you know how to classify and calculate your traffic.

I was talking to someone last night about their desire to buy traffic. He commonly does so and can list no less than ten traffic network sites he buys from. I couldn’t help but choke back a laugh when he told me, not surprisingly, they don’t always really convert that well.

I wanted to say, well duh?

But instead I tried to be nice and approach it from a different angle.

If you had a real store, like a grocery store, and had a choice for me to send you 1,000 people or 5 people, which would you prefer?

Obviously most people would say 1,000 right? But a smart person would want to know what kind of people these are.

The 1,000 people are just random people who typically aren’t into buying groceries in stores. But if you pick the 5, you can all but guarantee at least one of the 5 will buy something. Now which would you prefer?

That’s the thing about those traffic networks. They are full of shit ass traffic from places like tube sites. A traffic network valued my ad spot (the one I talked about earlier which made me $56.40 in 3 days) at a value of $2 per month.

Why? Well because they deal with a different kind of traffic. They deal with volume – tube sites have this volume and value based on the number of clicks, not the actual number of people that clicked and then bought. All they care about is how many people they can send to you site. The more people they can send your site, the more that ad is worth. The problem is, the type of traffic they are sending almost rarely converts. So now you have a bunch of traffic, but what’s the point?

So again I have to ask … would you rather have 1,000 random people who will probably not buy a damn thing from you, or 5 guys who are for sure interested in your type of store (site) and most likely 1 of them will buy from you?

Some tube sites are converting their traffic at 1:4500 some at 1:1600 and others don’t convert at 1:30,000 or even 1:60,000.

But you know what I convert at? Well it depends on the affiliate program, but my numbers are typically around 1:150 right now with Vivid Cash.

That means out of every 150 people that I send to Vivid, 1 person buys. That’s because I don’t have shitty ass tube or TGP traffic. I have quality, search engine traffic.

So since my traffic isn’t the same as tube traffic, how do I know how much to value it at, to sell it outright? That’s a great question and one that isn’t always easy.

First you need to really understand the type of traffic you have, not just where you get it from.

In the case of say my Fame Registry website, I know the majority of my traffic comes from search engines. But what TYPE of traffic is it? Well the theme of the website is porn star’s popularity so that means that people who are into porn stars (or popular porn stars) are my type of traffic.

So now I need to find an affiliate program that isn’t scammy (which isn’t always easy but there are some out there) who really focuses on the same thing my site does.

In the case of my Audrey Hollander website, that’s easy. I need to find a quality affiliate program that offers Audrey Hollander content.

Then I run a test and find out how much money that ad spot makes me. Then that becomes the value of my traffic. If I send all of my Audrey Hollander traffic to (whatever) affiliate program, and it makes me $65 a month, then I can sell that same spot to (whoever) for $65 a month, because that is what that spot would have earned me if I would have sent it to an affiliate program.

The only other thing to note is the length. It takes a lot of work to change up ads every month so I have a rule … depending on the site and type of ad, I require a 3 month, 6 month or 1 year commitment. Meaning they must pay for the entire length up front. That saves me the hassle of having to change up banners all the time. When you run as many sites as I do, you’ll learn that can get tiresome.